Photography & travel tips from an award-winning photographer, educator & wanderlust

What to do in Bali on a rainy day

If the forecast calls for rain and you think that your perfect day of sight seeing may be ruined – don’t despair! You may not get those clear, sunny blue skies in your travel photographs of Bali, full of lush green fields, smiling locals and purring Kopi Luwak cats.

Rainy conditions might be the perfect chance for you to sight see the island not risking your life on an ancient scooter/motorcycle, but in the comforts of your personal Aircon blowing, driver navigated, protective metal on all four sides – the TAXI!!!

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not usually the one to splurge, when other (more reasonable and inexpensive) methods can be used. But hiring a taxi for $50 (as of February 2016) for 8 hours (gas inclusive, tolls – not) on a rainy day to see a pretty expansive island, with its fair share of mediocre quality roads – in retrospect – was a great idea! So if you’re in the same predicament (weather or limited time in Bali), do so because:

1. A driver knows where to go and how to get there, just pick a place!

While staying in Cangu, we requested to see the rice fields of a place I could never pronounce right – Tegalalang, then pop over to Ubud, then drive South West to the Uluwatu Temple and lastly, to the East Coast and our next accommodation in Sanur. It took 8 hours and I’m sure it would have taken longer if it wasn’t for the knowledge and the sense of humor of our taxi driver.

2. On a rainy day, you can take as many images as you want in the comfort of your own taxi. The people around you have no idea and it helps if it’s a Sunday and they are coming back from some kind of religious event, dressed in their best. The following images were taken from the inside of a moving car.

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Sometimes the rain just stops abruptly and you drive through the heavenly fields like this one.

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3. In a rented vehicle, there is no need to worry about parking, fees or gas, because its all taken care of by the driver.

While visiting the popular spot of Tegalalang (Tag-Alla-lang should be easy enough to remember with my name in it!), we were in and out like bank robbers. Alright, almost as fast as robbers, but got persuaded by sweet little children to buy their Bali postcards. Begging children – they melt anyone’s heart, especially on a cold, rainy day….

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Can you spot a rice farmer in the next photograph?

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4. Your driver will probably take you to try Bali’s famous coffee – Kafe Luwak.

We thought it was $50/cup, but it was more like $4.50 with a tour, a taste room and a very friendly guide.

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The verdict: Since I’m not a coffee drinker (occasional Cafe Latte doesn’t count), Kafe Luwak was just a super strong cup of black coffee. My husband said – “Overrated, I liked Chiang Mai’s “Mountain Coffee” better!”

I couldn’t agree more!

So what else can I say about renting a taxi for a day in Bali – it was easy to do, we felt care free and most importantly – safe! As much as I enjoy the excitement of a rented scooter, something needs to be said for multiple accidents we’ve witnessed or have heard – that just don’t sound like my idea of an adventure to the emergency room in a foreign country.

So if you find yourself watching the rain droplets on your hostel’s window, make some room in your budget for an all day sight-seeing tour via taxi!

P.S. Droplets can make for some pretty cool photos too!

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